How Sleep Affects Muscle Growth


Successfully Building Your Muscles is more than just about the sweat and effort you apply to the gym. It is also about the amount of importance you give the other body functions like proper eating, and for today’s topic, proper sleeping. The exact amounts of sleep you will need depends largely on the individual. But, no matter who you are or how much exercise you do, too little sleep can hamper your efforts to greater strength and muscle mass. This following article contains all you need to know.

Cortisol Production

Cortisol is released from the adrenal glands during episodes of intense muscle exertion. Scientists believe the cortisol counters the effects of testosterone and human growth hormone and breaks down muscle tissue for energy purposes. This is not only inefficient, but counterproductive to your exercise and strength and muscle building. The body releases more cortisol into the blood when sleeping cycles are irregular or insufficient. With cortisol in the blood, one part of you is working to build and strengthen, while the other side is breaking down what you build for fuel, this is a poor condition for increased strength.

Glycogen Stores

Glycogen is how the body stores the glucose the muscle will use as energy during your training. You can gain a lot of this valuable energy from the carbohydrates you consume. But, it is your sleeping habits that enhance the way the glycogen is stored. Without regular sleep habits, you could diminish your body’s energy storing faculties and you can begin to lose energy halfway through your routine. Not only does this affect your capacity to exert yourself, but can add to the cortisol levels which are reducing your muscles to muscle fuel when your body is not able to sustain proper glycogen levels.

Delta Wave Sleep

You may think sleeping is no more than cutting “Z’s” with eyes closed. But, your body actually goes through several different stages of sleep, 4 to be exact. The 4th stage is called the “slow wave” phase and is essential to the production and regulation of growth hormones and testosterone. This happens when getting the proper amounts of sleep each night. According to Sports physiologist Dr. David Ryan, the proper sleeping times are either 4.5, 6, 7.5 or 9 hours each night. This will allow you to wake well rested and in a lighter frame of mind in the morning.

To gain ultimate success in your exercise efforts it is essential that you balance your sleep cycles with your daily efforts and fuel intake (eating). When these three activities balance each other out and are executed in ways that done adversely affect the others, the alchemy is formed.  Each activity will support the next and optimize the results of exercise and strength building.

By purchasing a good Tulo mattress and bed and  planning proper sleep habits, you will wake each morning having recuperated your strength and prepared your body for another effort. This sharpens your performance in the gym and leads to better results that fuel the inspiration for more. This also leads to a satisfied feeling in the evening that allows for better rest and sleep, and the cycle continues.


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