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The 13 Most Effective Ways To Manage & Curb Anger Outbursts

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The 13 Most Effective Ways To Manage & Curb Anger Outbursts

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Keeping anger inside you can lead to stress and anxiety. So it is important that we learn to understand, manage and curb our anger outbursts effectively. Anger can be a strong motivating force[1] and emotion so better anger management can put our anger energy to good use. Read on to learn the 13 Most Effective Ways To Manage & Curb Anger Outbursts.

LETS PRETEND

A great way to control your anger if you need help is to pretend you’re calm. Projecting an outward vision of calmness will actually help you feel more calm and less angry inside.

WALK AWAY

If you are in a situation that is making you angry, leave the room for a while or take a walk. It’s easier to think of solutions to problems when you have calmed down.

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Next time you feel your temper might get the better of you. try to explain your feelings to yourself to get at the root of your anger. Aim to be assertive but not aggressive in your dealings with others.

SPOT THOSE TRIGGERS

If you feel your anger is out of control, wait until you’re feeling positive and try to think about the things that trigger loss of temper. Then, work out how you could avoid those triggers.

PLAY MUSIC TO AVOID ROAD RAGE

Instead of sitting in a silent car with nothing but the sounds of traffic to spark off road rage, listen to your favorite music or the radio to distract your anger. Listen to Passenger.

RELAX AWAY RAGE

Gripping the wheel, slouching and arching your back while driving all cause muscles to become tense. Take a moment when you’re driving to consciously relax tense muscles to help you remain calm.

TAKE A BREATH

When you get angry, a big surge of adrenaline goes through your body and your heart rate and blood pressure go up. This causes the reasoning part of your brain to shut off for a short while. Taking a deep breath short circuits this system to help you regain control.

SUPPRESS ANGER FOR GOOD USE LATER

If you have anger problems, instead of allowing yourself to fly off the handle the next time you feel angry, make a deliberate effort to quash your feelings. Then, when you have calmed down, you can take that energy and put it to positive use.

ALLOW MORE TIME

If you find yourself’ getting angry when you’re driving on particular journeys, allow more time and avoid travelling at high traffic periods. The same applies when you’re not driving, always leave plenty of time to allow for delays. One of the most stressful aspects of modern living is being under time pressure.

BE REASONABLE

Use words to describe your anger and help you decide if it’s appropriate or not. For instance, if someone causes you pain it’s reasonable to feel angry, but if  they simply get in your way or slow you down its not.

FUSED EMOTIONS

Don’t confuse anger with jealousy[2]. It’s not reasonable to feel angry with someone simply because they have something you don’t or are better than you at something.

DEFINE YOUR ANGER

Learn to define your problem and face it head-on rather than let it build up. Passively allowing circumstances you are unhappy with to continue will lead to suppressing your anger, which can stop you being able to act to real and serious threats to your well being.

ACT, DON’T REACT

Stop reacting to what others say or do, and act positively instead. changing the situation through deeds. rather than words, is less inflammatory and requires thinking it through.

Did you like this article? Let us know in the comments below. Also, checkout 12 Great Ways To Meditate Daily & Effectively !!

References:

[1] Jennifer L. Stewart, Rebecca L. Levin, Sarah M. Sass, Wendy Heller, and Gregory A. Miller. Anger Style, Psychopathology, and Regional Brain Activity. Emotion. 2008 October; 8(5): 701–713. doi: 10.1037/a0013447. PMCID: PMC3047003. NIHMSID: NIHMS200688.

[2] Fitness J, Fletcher GJ. Love, hate, anger, and jealousy in close relationships: a prototype and cognitive appraisal analysis. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1993 Nov;65(5):942-58.